How does the use of dialogue between socrates and glaucon contribute to the text answer

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Summary and Analysis Book V: Section II Summary. Socrates now turns his attention to the question as to whether such a class as the Guardians would bepossible. His answer is yes; we agree that the Guardians must defend the state, and we agree that the men and women and children of this class are to attain equality through nurture and education. Not until Glaucon insists that this is a city only valid for swine does Plato’s Socrates change course, saying he now understands it is the origins of a luxurious city that they are in search of, so that they might “see how justice and injustice grow up in cities,” but not before warning that “the true city, in my view, is the one we ... Just about everything Glaucon says is aimed to support the main point of the speech and to argue against Socrates' position. MOST OF THE KEY STEPS It's up to you to distinguish between premises, intermediate steps, and conclusions, and to determine to the best of your ability, given the evidence of the text, the hints above, and our discussions ... How does the use of dialogue between Socrates and Glaucon contribute to the text? A. Glaucon's consistent agreement with Socrates encourages readers to view Socrates' ideas favorably. B. Socrates asserts his expertise while debating various ideas with Glaucon. C.

B Socrates asserts his expertise while debating various ideas with Glaucon. C Glaucon finds flaws in Socrates’ arguments, which deepens the conversation between the two men. D Socrates is able to demonstrate how gaining knowledge is a fulfilling endeavor by answering Glaucon’s questions. Summary and Analysis Book II: Section I Summary. Thrasymachus is now out of the dialogue, having gracelessly told Socrates that Socrates was all along seeking to do Thrasymachus personal injury in making him look bad in the argument and that Socrates probably cheated somehow in achieving the final rebuttal. Feb 19, 2011 · Within the dialogue, the conversation is portrayed as occurring at the house of Cephalus, a rich, elderly manufacturer of shields, a resident alien in Athens, located in the port area Piraeus. Cephalus is the father of Polemarchus, one of the main participants in the dialogue. Summary and Analysis Book II: Section I Summary. Thrasymachus is now out of the dialogue, having gracelessly told Socrates that Socrates was all along seeking to do Thrasymachus personal injury in making him look bad in the argument and that Socrates probably cheated somehow in achieving the final rebuttal. Plato wrote a dialogue between two characters, Socrates and Glaucon, in which they discuss the future of their cities. Socrates says the cities should be simple, and the citizens should subsist on barley and wheat, with “relishes” of salt, olives, cheese and “country fare of boiled onions...

As I said in an earlier post, there is a contrary movement in the dialogue between Socrates and Cephalus, Socrates asking first to be taught about the future and the life in old age and being dragged by Cephalus' answers to eventually inquire about how the past explains the present, but being answered by Cephalus talking first about the past ... Feb 24, 2016 · Socrates’ answer to Glaucon and Adeimantus is that, despite appearances, we should choose the life of the “unsuccessful” just person because it is to our advantage to be moral. Socrates’ answer depends on a notion of mental health. He contends that immorality corrupts the inner person, so that one is happy or unhappy in exact proportion to one’s moral integrity. Is this a plausible ... 2. Socrates and Glaucon are not equal in intellectual authorities. Socrates is considered to be one of the most influential of Greek philosophers, and Glaucon is rarely known to the world, and even though he was his student, he never surpassed him. On the other side, Glaucon’s younger brother Plato may be considered as Socrates equal. 3.

Just about everything Glaucon says is aimed to support the main point of the speech and to argue against Socrates' position. MOST OF THE KEY STEPS It's up to you to distinguish between premises, intermediate steps, and conclusions, and to determine to the best of your ability, given the evidence of the text, the hints above, and our discussions ... Plato wrote a dialogue between two characters, Socrates and Glaucon, in which they discuss the future of their cities. Socrates says the cities should be simple, and the citizens should subsist on barley and wheat, with “relishes” of salt, olives, cheese and “country fare of boiled onions...

Essay Justice In Plato's Republic. In Plato’s Republic, a portrayal of the longing quest to determine the most suitable conception of justice makes practical use between Socrates and fellow Athenians to examine the many aspects of the complex conception, especially justice’s value. But the dialogue is not a hotchpotch of loosely related topics - Socrates has a clear conception of how these issues intermesh. In particular, he argues, we cannot understand the value of justice - personal or political - unless we understand what goodness is in reality, and how we come to know it. So how does Socrates’ answer Glaucon’s ...

But you have, Socrates, said Glaucon: and you, Thrasymachus, need be under no anxiety about money, for we will all make a contribution for Socrates. Yes, he replied, and then Socrates will do as he always does --refuse to answer himself, but take and pull to pieces the answer of some one else. Glaucon’s challenge to Socrates consisted of three main points. The first point was about the common conception of justice and its origins. The second point states that justice was only an instrumental good. Finally, the last point, also the main thesis, of Glaucon’s challenge stated that t... The first is Glaucon’s claim that people act justly unwillingly. That the only reason people act and conform with the laws of morality is because they will gain good reputations thereby. And the second is Glaucon’s claim that they are right to do so. So the text begins with a fundamental contrast. One that is useful, not only in the context ... Socrates and Glaucon essaysIn the conversation, Socrates talks about the true forms of things. The idea is that there is such a thing as a true bed, or a true chair, or true virtue, or whatever else. So when an artisan builds a chair, he is building the idea of a chair and not the true chair which e

In the second book of Plato’s Republic, Glaucon challenges Socrates to defend the thesis that justice is a benefit to its possessor. As every reader of the dialogue knows, Socrates thinks that the justice of a human being will best be understood after one has considered the justice of a city. But his reason for thinking this is far from obvious. But you have, Socrates, said Glaucon: and you, Thrasymachus, need be under no anxiety about money, for we will all make a contribution for Socrates. Yes, he replied, and then Socrates will do as he always does --refuse to answer himself, but take and pull to pieces the answer of some one else.

Apr 21, 2016 · This could imply that Glaucon is Socrates’ main concern. This combined with the dramatic emphasis Plato puts on Adeimantus as an interruption and diverter of that conversation suggests that Glaucon and Socrates’ conversation is primary, and that Adeimantus is more of an observer who interrupts when he deems it necessary.

There is a lot of question-and-answer in especially the early dialogues, and it does not there commit Socrates to any specific 'big' views. We know that "Plato's logical acumen is substantial" (8), yet some of the arguments usually taken to support substantive doctrines are terrible. Essay Justice In Plato's Republic. In Plato’s Republic, a portrayal of the longing quest to determine the most suitable conception of justice makes practical use between Socrates and fellow Athenians to examine the many aspects of the complex conception, especially justice’s value. Glaucon’s Challenge. Book I tells us about Plato’s motivations for writing The Republic. He was worried that failure to reflect on questions about justice left his society open to ideas such as those expressed by Thrasymachus. Glaucon formulated the official challenge that the work as a whole seeks to address at the beginning of Book II. Plato's Republic Questions and Answers - Discover the eNotes.com community of teachers, mentors and students just like you that can answer any question you might have on Plato's Republic How does the use of dialogue between Socrates and Glaucon contribute to the text? It makes their conversion relatable and human What does the quote "Men would say of him that up he went and down he came without his eyes" from paragraph 33 mean in the context of the passage as a whole?

As I said in an earlier post, there is a contrary movement in the dialogue between Socrates and Cephalus, Socrates asking first to be taught about the future and the life in old age and being dragged by Cephalus' answers to eventually inquire about how the past explains the present, but being answered by Cephalus talking first about the past ...

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What is the relationship between Socrates and Glaucon? Are they equal in intellectual authority? Are they concerned with the same issues? How does the allegory of the prisoners in the cave watching shadows on a wall relate to us today? What are the shadows that we see and how do they distort our sense of what is real? Essay Justice In Plato's Republic. In Plato’s Republic, a portrayal of the longing quest to determine the most suitable conception of justice makes practical use between Socrates and fellow Athenians to examine the many aspects of the complex conception, especially justice’s value. Socrates cheerfully accepts Glaucon's proposition. Glaucon's first assertion, according to the popular definition, is that justice is a legally enforced compromise between doing injustice to others and having injustice done unto oneself. He relates an allegory of a shepherd who discovers a magic ring. The ring grants its wearer invisibility.

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Glaucon proposes a mind-experiment: the myth of the magic ring of Gyges. Note how his account relates to the ad populum fallacy. If anyone had a ring that would make him invisible, then that person would be a fool not to use it for personal advantage. While Plato spends much of the Republic having Socrates narrate a conversation about the city he founds with Glaucon and Adeimantus "in speech", the discussion eventually turns to considering four regimes that exist in reality and tend to degrade successively into each other: timocracy, oligarchy (also called plutocracy), democracy and tyranny ...

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The dialogue begins with Socrates going to the Piraeus, the port of Athens, to attend the festival of the Thracian goddess, Bendis, suggesting that the festival was more “international” than the short distance to the Piraeus might indicate, especially in view of Socrates's remark that the Thracian procession was as fine as the Athenian one ...

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How does the use of dialogue between Socrates and Glaucon contribute to the text? A. Glaucon's consistent agreement with Socrates encourages readers to view Socrates' ideas favorably. B. Socrates asserts his expertise while debating various ideas with Glaucon. C. Summary: Book II, 357a–368c. Socrates believes he has adequately responded to Thrasymachus and is through with the discussion of justice, but the others are not satisfied with the conclusion they have reached. Glaucon, one of Socrates’s young companions, explains what they would like him to do. Glaucon states that all goods can be divided ... B. Socrates asserts his expertise while debating various ideas with Glaucon. C. Glaucon finds flaws in Socrates’ arguments, which deepens the conversation between the two men. D. Socrates is able to demonstrate how gaining knowledge is a fulfilling endeavor by answering Glaucon’s questions. 4. What does the quote “Men would say of him that up he went and down he came without Socrates: Last of he will be able to see the sun, and not mere reflections of him in the water, but he will see him in his own proper place, and not in another; and he will contemplate him as he is. Glaucon: Certainly. [25] Socrates: He will then proceed to argue that this is he who gives the season and the years,...
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B. Socrates asserts his expertise while debating various ideas with Glaucon. C. Glaucon finds flaws in Socrates’ arguments, which deepens the conversation between the two men. D. Socrates is able to demonstrate how gaining knowledge is a fulfilling endeavor by answering Glaucon’s questions. 4. What does the quote “Men would say of him that up he went and down he came without Glaucon’s Challenge. Book I tells us about Plato’s motivations for writing The Republic. He was worried that failure to reflect on questions about justice left his society open to ideas such as those expressed by Thrasymachus. Glaucon formulated the official challenge that the work as a whole seeks to address at the beginning of Book II. 2. Socrates and Glaucon are not equal in intellectual authorities. Socrates is considered to be one of the most influential of Greek philosophers, and Glaucon is rarely known to the world, and even though he was his student, he never surpassed him. On the other side, Glaucon’s younger brother Plato may be considered as Socrates equal. 3. In Book II, Glaucon & Adeimantus take up Thrasymachus' argumen…. Glaucon presents Socrates with a challenge here that will occu…. Socrates now begins his long response to this challenge, which…. Arises due to our lack of self-sufficiency (369b)... conversation and debate led by Socrates and his infinite interrogative questioning of the topic of justice. Socrates, Glaucon, Cephalus, Polemarchus, who is Cephalus’ son, and Thrasymachus are all involved in this rather lengthy conversation. It all takes place on their way home after a prayer to the goddess, and a festival procession. Glaucon’s challenge to Socrates consisted of three main points. The first point was about the common conception of justice and its origins. The second point states that justice was only an instrumental good. Finally, the last point, also the main thesis, of Glaucon’s challenge stated that t... Glaucon in the Republic. In Plato's Republic, Glaucon is introduced to the reader as a man who loves honor, sex, and luxury. As The Republic progresses through books and Socrates' arguments of how and why these flaws make the soul unhappy began to piece together, Glaucon relates some of these cases to his own life, and begins to see how Socrates' line of reasoning makes more sense than his own. B Socrates asserts his expertise while debating various ideas with Glaucon. C Glaucon finds flaws in Socrates’ arguments, which deepens the conversation between the two men. D Socrates is able to demonstrate how gaining knowledge is a fulfilling endeavor by answering Glaucon’s questions. Is it ok to sleep next to an outlet